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The Voice of the Illinois Soldiers.

The 119th and the 126th Illinois regiments lately held a meeting at Humboldt, Tenn., to express their views on Copperheadism, and after several speeches and the usual formalities, unanimously adopted the resolutions below. The 119th was represented by Lieut. Col. Taylor. The regiment is partly composed of men from this county, one company being in command of Capt. Hugo Hollas, and it will rejoice our readers to hear of their sturdy and earnest loyalty:

Whereas, our Government is engaged in a struggle involving its very existence, and with it the perpetuity of every right dear to us as American citizens, requiring the united efforts of all good, true and loyal men in its behalf, and

Whereas, We have beheld with deep sorrow and regret the bitter partisan spirit which is now becoming dangerous, malicious and revengeful in our own State and elsewhere, calculated to discourage soldiers and weaken the army in this its great effort to save our common country from ruin by the suppression of this wicked and causeless rebellion, therefore,

Resolved, That having pledged our lives and every cherished earthly interest, to the service of our common country in this the darkest hour of her peril, we ask and insist that our friends and neighbors at home lay aside all party jealousies and party animosities and stand nobly by us in upholding the President in his effort to maintain the dignity, authority and unity of the Government and unfurling again the glorious emblem of our nationality in every city and town in rebeldom, and in enforcing strict obedience to the Constitution and the laws throughout our whole country.

Resolved, That we tender to Governor Yates and Adjutant Gen. Fuller our warmest thanks and congratulations for their untiring zeal and energy in raising, organizing and equipping the army which Illinois has sent to the field, and for the timely aid and attention to our sick and wounded soldiers, and we assure them of our steady and warm support in every effort to maintain for Illinois the noble character of pre eminent loyalty which she so richly earned and still occupies.

Resolved, That we have watched with disgust and shame the traitorous conduct of many officers and citizens in high and humble stations who have lent their aid to weaken the force and thwart the success of our noble army by acts calculated to discourage enlistment, encourage desertions, and by many other means give aid and comfort to the enemy, who is nearly exhausted, and we would say to them — "beware of the terrible retribution" which is falling upon your coadjutors of the South, and as your crime is, to say the least, no less than theirs, remember that justice sleeps not! But will as surely visit you as you persist in your wicked and shameless deed of treason.

Resolved, That we are opposed to any other terms of peace with the rebellious States than that already offered — return to loyalty and obedience to the laws, on a level with the other States of the Union, under the Constitution, as our fathers made it.

Resolved, That we hold in utter detestation and will ever execrate, any man who offers factions opposition to either State or Federal Authorities, in their efforts for a vigorous prosecution of this war for the suppression of this detestable and miserable rebellion.

Resolved, That we enlisted, not to build up any political party, but to save our country; and that we look upon and shall treat as enemies all persons, white or black, that by word or deed oppose us, whether in the army in front, or near our firesides in the rear; that we will unitedly and determinedly oppose any and all political parties built up on the misfortunes of our country; that this is no time to distract the country by discussing political questions, but that every man should put his shoulder to the wheel and assist in putting an end to this Godless rebellion.

Resolved, That we entirely disapprove of all political controversies whatever in the army, believing that no good but much harm must necessarily result from such controversy; and we insist that all who wish to be considered as good soldiers, and all who value the Government as of more importance than their own private or political notions, will hereafter refrain therefrom.