3

Further news from Lee's Army!

Particulars of the Pursuit!

Jeff and Cabinet run for Danville!

Stoneman tearing up more Railroads!

Total Route of Forrest's Army!

SHERMAN IN RALEIGH!

Lincoln Returned to Washington!

Measures being taken for the Return of Virginia to the Union!

FIGHT AT MOBILE!

Rebels Driven into their Forts!

Hopes of Capture of Breckenridge!

Rumored Surrender of Johnston!

Rumored Special Session of Congress!

[The following is additional to the dispatches sent yesterday, giving the details of the pursuit of Lee's army, and the events which preceded its surrender.]

NEW YORK, April 10. — The whole army in the morning moved five miles on the road to Dentonville. In the forenoon the 2d and 5th corps succeeded in falling upon Gordon's corps, guarding Lee's army in the vicinity of Dentonville, stampeding a portion of it and making many captures of men and material. Gordon took up one position after another on the hill tops, and succeeded in retarding our pursuit to a limited extent. Refugees and deserters stated that the rebel army was falling to pieces. A refugee also said trains were running from Richmond to Danville and Greensboro Railroad, tearing it up between those places.

The Herald's correspondent from the cavalry recounts the movements of this arm of the service, in pursuit of Lee. The rear guard of the rebel army was overtaken, numbering 320, strongly entrenched across Namogire creek, having destroyed the bridge and felled trees across the ford to impede pursuit. On advancing, the enemy opened fire, which was returned with vigor. They were finally shelled from their position. A number of men at once dismounted, the obstructions were removed, and the command crossed. Evidences of demoralization on the part of the enemy were at once met with. The road was strown with all sorts of munitions of war. Cannon and ammunition were discovered secreted in the woods. Pushing on, Barringer's brigade of cavalry was soon encountered by our second brigade, Col. Wells commanding. The rebels scattered like a flock of sheep, on being fired upon. In this charge Lt. Custar, brother of the General, got detached from the command, but came in with a rebel battle flag and fourteen johnnies. Col. Capehart, 3d brigade, about the same time, overtook the rebels near Dennisville. Spreading on each side of the road, our men went in under the wildest excitement. Gen. Custar seeing that unless we covered more ground with our cavalry, many more rebels would escape, sent back and hurried up the 1st brigade. Several miles were thus passed over, and many rebels and munitions gathered in. Finally the rebs rallied to make a stand. Our cavalry formed for a charge, when a strong force of rebel infantry was discovered in our rear. Our men fought, slowly falling back, when they were reinforced and the rebels driven again, followed closely until night set in. The rebels had been driven 22 miles, routed at every point, and losing men, army wagons, &c. Our whole loss was not 50.

On the 4th the march was resumed, and continued till afternoon, when the enemy were overtaken, and skirmishing ensued, which continued until night. On the 5th the fight took place, which has already been detailed.

NEW YORK, April 10. — The Commercial's Washington special says sufficient time has elapsed for Wilson to reach Selma, and the military authorities have been expecting to hear of its fall.

John C. Breckinridge was known to be with Lee on Friday, and hopes are entertained that he has been captured. Pollard who took advantage of the escape of Mr. Richardson, has been arrested in Richmond and committed to Castle Thunder for treasonable language.

The steamer City of Dunkirk, which was to sail to-morrow for Liverpool, was dispatched this afternoon at 4 o'clock, in order to take out the news of Gen. Lee's capitulation. She is in light trim, and will undoubtedly make a quick passage.

The Commercial's special says orders will be sent to our Generals everywhere to open communications with the enemy and commanders of rebels in their front, and offer the same terms as were accepted by Gen. Lee. No difficulty is anticipated except in Texas.