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The Trade of the Mississippi Opened.

General Banks has issued an order declaring trade upon the Lower Mississippi from Cairo, St. Louis and other towns on the Upper Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio rivers, free from military restrictions within his Department. All limitations are removed, except such as may be necessary to prevent provisions and munitions of war from reaching the rebels. The region to which the order applies extends from the mouth of the Mississippi to Port Hudson. The following is the part of the order which refers to this subject:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF,
NEW ORLEANS, Sept. 3, 1863.

General Orders, No. 66.]

1st. The trade of this city with Cairo, St. Louis, and the cities and towns of the Upper Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio rivers is hereby declared free from any military restrictions whatever. The trade of Mississippi and intermediate points within the Department of the Gulf is held subject only to such limitations as may be necessary to prevent the supply of provisions and munitions of war to the enemies of the country.

2. The products of the country intended for the general market may be brought into military posts on the line of the Mississippi within the Department of the Gulf without restraints, viz.: At New Orleans, Carrollton, Donaldsonville, Baton Rouge and Port Hudson.

So it turns out that "Chase's blockade," which was so much "more aggravating" to the Register than the rebel one, had been removed by Gen. Banks, showing that it was not Chase's at last. That Gen. Grant will issue a similar order with reference to trade in his department, as soon as it can be done without giving aid to the rebellion, we have no doubt.

It is a highly significant fact the a New England General has been the first to declare the trade of the Lower Mississippi with Northern cities open, although the Register represented that he would keep it closed for the benefit of eastern capitalists. The same paper also announced a few months since that the same New England General would "do nothing to restore to the West its channel of transportation and trade." A few months ago Gen. Banks knocked off the last link that bound the navigation of the Mississippi at Port Hudson, and now he completes the work by declaring the river open to trade.

If it had been the Register's object, with prescient wisdom, to contradict and belie history, it could not have succeeded better. But it spoke not with the spirit of prophecy, but simply with the same instinct which led Jeff. Davis and the London Times to assert, in nearly the same language, last winter, that Vicksburg and Port Hudson would not be captured.

Will our neighbor complain now that General Banks still holds the trade of the Mississippi "subject only to such limitations as may be necessary to prevent the supply of provisions and munitions of war to the enemies of the country?"