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Good Effects of the President's Position.

— The good effects of President Lincoln's position in regard to arming the slaves, are every day becoming more manifest. It greatly strengthens the Union cause in the border slave States, and satisfies the loyal people that the President is honest in his oft-repeated declaration — that the war is for the preservation of the government, and for the protection of the rights and property of all loyal citizens; and not as the Black Republican press would make us believe, for the abolition of slavery, and the subversion of the Constitution. Late advices from Kentucky are to the effect that the action of the President in modifying Cameron's abolition report has greatly re-assured the Union men of that State, who had become apprehensive on account of the threatening position of Congress. It is believed that if the government had adopted Cameron's policy, it would have entirely destroyed the last vestige of Unionism in Kentucky, and converted that State into a bitter and uncompromising foe of the Union. Accounts from Western Virginia and Missouri are to the same effect. Still the Abolition Black Republican papers and leaders are urging this policy upon the Administration. Turn a deaf ear to the entreaties of the loyal people of Western Virginia, who have evinced their patriotism and devotion to the Union by braving the dangers and hardships of the battle-field and bringing a devastating war upon their own soil, in its defense disregard the efforts and trample upon the rights of the loyal population of Kentucky, who have thrice declared their unalterable devotion to their country, notwithstanding the supremacy of a party of whose power they have always entertained the gravest fears; treat with contempt Johnson, Brownlow and the gallant band in East Tennessee, who have centered upon themselves the hatred and persecution of the entire South, by their love for the government; turn with scorn from the appeals of the Unionists of Missouri, who have held their State firm to its allegiance, despite the efforts of designing demagogues of her own borders, and the united power of Arkansas, Texas and other of the rebel States, to fasten upon her the coils of secession; such are the cries of Black Republicanism. The abolition of slavery, the subversion of the Constitution, and the destruction of the Government, are the ends for which it is now laboring. But the President has shown himself an honest man by coming out from among them. Let him disregard their demands in future, and labor only for the best interests of the nation, and the ultimate triumph of the Union cause is sure.