2

Further from the Culpepper Battle.

Exclusively for the Daily Argus.

DISCOURAGING STATE OF AFFAIRS ON THE RAPPAHANNOCK!

An Order from the War Department in Relation to Absent Soldiers &c., &c., &c.

THE ENEMY BELIEVED TO BE MOVING ON NORFOLK AND PORTSMOUTH.

Another Order in Relation to Sneaks.

THE REBELS TAKE INDEPENDENCE.

Another Attack Expected on the Indiana Border.

Telegraphed to the Rock Island Argus.

WASHINGTON, Aug 11. — Accounts from Culpepper represent the enemys estimated force engaged at 20,000 — ours exclusive of cavalry and artillery, as not exceeding 7,000.

The number of U.S. soldiers wounded is large and generally slight. The number killed is small.

On Saturday night the teamsters lit their fires, causing the enemy to shell our new position for two hours with considerable effect.

Yesterday morning the rebels were not in sight on our front, but the indications were that they were reinforced on Saturday, and were attempting to flank our movements.

Nothing has yet been heard from Gen. Buford at Madison Court House.

The rebels unmasked batteries on the mountain slopes and on every hill, making a descent of batteries of nearly 3 miles commanding our position. For two hours our batteries were exposed to cross fire and flank fire at every point.

The rebels evidently outnumbered us in guns and weight of metal. We replied shot for shot till 5 o'clock, when the rebels opened an enfilade battery on our right. Gen. Banks here gave orders to cease firing, and charge the battery. The duty was assigned to Crawford's brigade, of William's division, and the 46th Pa. regiment led the charge.

Behind the battery was a thicket of shrub oak, and before the 46th Pa. could reach the rebel battery they were bowed down by a terrific fire from the thicket.

The rest of the brigade was quickly brought up and subsequently the rest of Gens. Williams' and Gen. Augur's commands, but the brigades of the rebels were found at every point.

The battle ground was in a thick wood with a ravine on our right. Here nearly all the infantry had been concentrated during the shelling, after expelling our pickets.

This was probably one of the hardest contested fights in Virginia, lasting until dark, when our forces retired, taking a new position beyond the reach of the enemy's guns.

Our infantry is badly cut up, and we lost 2 guns.

The enemy's loss was certainly greater than ours, as their dense columns were frequently riddled by our artillery.

Since our correspondent left the field large reinforcements have reached there.