1

Telegraphic.

FURTHER PARTICULARS OF THE FIGHT AT CARTHAGE.

LATER FROM FORT MONROE.

REBEL SCHEME TO SEIZE STEAMERS DEFEATED.

KIT CARSON TO JOIN FREMONT

GEN. LEE RESIGNED HIS REBEL COMMAND

LATER FROM COL. SMITH'S COMMAND

The following appeared only in part of Yesterday Morning's Edition.

ST. LOUIS, July 10. — Special messenger arrived this evening by Pacific railroad, with dispatches from Col. Seigel to Adjutant Harding at the Arsenal, the following abstract, written at Rolla, for the Democrat, on the morning of the 9th. —

Col. Seigel, with a portion of his regiment, part Col. Soloman's, and 10 pieces artillery were in action. From 1,100 to 1,200 men attacked a body of 6,000 rebels, under Gen. Raimes. Col. Parson is about 7 miles east of Carthage, on the prairie.

The enemy had 5 pieces of cannon and many in united men.

Col. Sigel began the attack at half past nine in the morning, breaking the disunion center twice, after an hour and a half's fighting silenced their artillery.

The rebels had three flags, one of the state of Missouri, which was left unharmed and two secession flags which were twice shot down and rallied no more.

In the evening they attempted to out flank our [unknown] with their cavalry and cut off our baggage, but Sigel made a retreating movement, keeping up a constant ring and ordered the baggage train to advance, which was forced in columns, with a battalion of infantry, supported by pieces of artillery near the rear of each body, and the remainder of the artillery in front.

One flank of the rebels attempted to cut off his communication with Carthage with their cavalry, but the artillery took them at cross-fire, which played havoc on their ranks, which opened and retreated. Seigel fell back to Carthage, the enemy harassing his flank up to town, where another stand was made, the rebels being in possession of the space. Seigel then surrounded the town, throwing shot and grenades into the enemy's cavalry, and using his infantry with great effect. While attempting to reach the adjacent woods to prevent the loss of cavalry, the rebels made the most serious attacks, and the bloodiest part of the battle was fought, but the enemies were finally routed and forced to withdraw their forces.

Siegel then fell back on Mount Vernon where he could be supported.

Some captured officers, reported their loss at the Mount as the severest fighting was done subsequently. It was believed that that their loss is considerably greater. Forty-three prisoners were taken. Our loss in killed is 8 and 45 wounded and missing.

The battle in which Col. Wolff was killed was fought on Saturday, thirty miles from Springfield.