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Glorious News!

VICTORY AT PETERSBURG.

MANY PRISONERS CAPTURED.

Important from Sherman.

New York Stock & Produce Market.

ETC., ETC., ETC.

NEW YORK, March 28. — The 2d corps correspondent says that the troops were aroused at early dawn by reports of fighting on the right. The men were got into line and a reconnoisance sent out, which returned bringing in some prisoners. Soon after, the enemy's skirmishers were met and driven in off their picket line, and their rifle pits were occupied by our troops.

About 5 o'clock, the enemy made an attack. They came up in gallant style, and demonstrated that there was still some fight in them. It was successfully met and repelled, however. They soon recovered and again advanced, only to be driven back with great slaughter. Four assaults were thus repulsed, when the enemy withdrew.

The 5th corps correspondent, says there was wide-spread and special enthusiasm at night over the glorious successes of the day. Between 3,000 and 4,000 prisoners were reported ours, and since it has been reported that several hundred more have been brought in.

The Herald's Newbern correspondent says that General Sherman is said to have informed prominent officers on leaving Fayetteville, that if he reached Goldsboro without much trouble, the game was then up with the rebels, as with a concentration with Schofield and Terry's forces, nothing could withstand their onset.

The Herald's Dauphin Island, Ala., correspondent, of the 15th, says the authorities refuse to exchange newspapers.

One of our monitors made an important reconnoissance of rebel works, on the 15th, and was allowed to move about without being fired upon.

The authorities of the city appeared to be determined to make a strong resistance.

Rumors were rife in New Orleans that the rebel troops were preparing to evacuate Mobile and join Lee's army somewhere in East Tennessee.

The Tribune's Goldsboro, N. C., correspondent, of the 21st, says:

Johnston's entire force confronts Sherman, at Smithfield, the latter being on the South side of the river, and the former on the north side.

Late despatches, dated the 22d, confirm this statement.

In the engagement on Tuesday, the 19th, the rebels attacked Sherman's centre heavily, but were driven off the field, leaving their dead and wounded in our hands.

Our loss was not heavy.

Sherman pushed forward rapidly obliging the rebels to fall back with some haste toward Smithfield.

Another fight obliged them to rush through Smithfield, and make for Raleigh. Sherman followed with all speed and entered Smithfield.