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A Day of Sadness.

Yesterday was emphatically a day of mourning in this city. The Proclamations of Gov. [unknown] and Mayor Wilson were rigorously served and promptly acceded to. Sadness was deeply impressed upon the faces of all. A stranger visiting our city, ignorant of the [unknown] could quickly have discerned that some awful calamity had befallen our people, and as our mourning was not formal, but deep-felt and enduring. The emblems of bereavement were visible throughout our limits. Flags at half-mast, store fronts and residences clothed with the emblems of death, the left arms of citizens bandaged with crape and tolling of bells all denoted the universal sentiment of re[unknown] and regret for the illustrious dead.

Promptly at 11 o'clock a. m. business houses of every description were closed, and all, with one accord, suspended their avocations and [unknown] the throng winding its way to the different places of worship in our city, there to few before the Almighty, and as commanded, say "Thy will be done."

At the appointed hour the members of the 42d Wisconsin regiment, with muffled drums, reversed arms, and slow and measured tread, marched through our streets, and on their return to their quarters listened to an eloquent sermon from the Chaplain.

The "Arab" and "Rough and Ready" Fire Companies presented a fine appearance as they marched through the streets on their way to the Episcopal Church, there to listen to Rev. [unknown] Lyle.

The Turners! Society had a procession and afterward appropriate services at their hall.

Altogether the day was observed in such a manner as to gratify the heart of ever lover of his country.